A Staten Island triathlete and endurance coach ventures into the ultramarathon realm where there are seemingly no limits to human endurance. In 2013, he successfully finished the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning (picture of 2013 Grand Slam finishers above; I'm second from right), becoming only the 282nd person (since its beginnings in 1986) and only the fourth New Yorker to finish four of the oldest and most prestigious 100 mile ultramarathons in the U.S. in only 10 weeks.

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Thoughts - February 15

Ultramarathons are much quicker to recover from than marathons.

Just the mention of the Massanutten 100 had people I didn't know patting me on the back and wishing me luck in that race while I was in Virginia this past weekend. This race must be extremely difficult.

The Beast Series is seriously calling out to me. The problem is, the Grindstone 100, the premier race of this series, is the same weekend as the Virginia Double Ironman. Should I change the schedule?

At the end of every day I have to remember always to organize for the next day. If I don't roll out of bed and into my running shoes, I start to procrastinate.

As of Tuesday, one small section in my hamstring is a bit tight from the Holiday Lake Ultra. Everything else is fine.

I've never done two marathons in 2 consecutive weekends. Yet, I am poised to do 2 50k ultras in as many weekends. Another test of my training methods, of course.

The SIAC wants me to do The Cherry Tree 10 race in Prospect Park the day after the Febapple 50k ultra this weekend. Is it crazy to even entertain this thought?

That IBM computer Watson held its own against two of the most celebrated Jeopardy champs of all time last night. Does this mean humanity is becoming obsolete now?

1 comment:

  1. I would do the 10 mile event-maybe not race it-after the ultra. Good training.

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